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04 May 2005 @ 01:10 am
Ed and Chalk. ^__^;  

This afternoon, I was studying for my history final browsing FMA sites.  While waiting for a page to load I glanced out my window and saw this:




 


My first thought was "Ed!!!" - because of the coat. ^^;

This was actually my friend saanders.  We had a conversation the previous night via LJ which resulted in looking up a passage in the Bible.  Thus:



 


That's Numbers: 4-9. Not 49. ^^;
Not going with the Flamel from FMA, she made up her own design.  (Which I think is pretty cool. ^__^)
Here's a close up of the flamel.



Sorry for the big pics. m(_ _)m
Thee End! XD; 

 
 
Current Mood: stressedavoiding studying for finals
Current Music: Kesenai Tsumi (Instrumental)
 
 
corinn on May 4th, 2005 01:11 am (UTC)
Cool art. She has talent.

...*looks up Numbers 21:4-9*

For everyone without access to a Bible, this is what my modernized Bible says:

4. Then the people of Israel set out from Mount Hor, taking the road to the Red Sea to go around the land of Edom. But the people grew impatient along the way, 5. and they began to murmur against God and Moses. "Why have you brought us out of Egypt to die here in the wilderness?" they complained. "There is nothing to eat here and nothing to drink. And we hate this wretched manna!" 6. So the LORD sent poisonous snakes among them, and many of them were bitten and died. 7. Then the people came to Moses and cried out, "We have sinned by speaking against the LORD and against you. Pray that the LORD will take away the snakes." So Moses prayed for the people.

8. Then the LORD told him, "Make a replica of a poisonous snake and attach it to the top of a pole. Those who are bitten will live if they simply look at it!" 9. So Moses made a snake out of bronze and attached it to the top of a pole. Whenever those who were bitten looked at the bronze snake, they recovered!




...COOL. The philosophical implications of the flamel now make more sense to me. They wear it as a sign of sin, repentance of sin, and wish to recover from their sin. And the whole bronze thing explains why there was the (I'm guessing brass) flamel in Dante's library. Well, at least why it looked like bronze. ^^;;;

The whole passage parallels the Elrics and Izumi, those who bear the flamel. The people who were not happy with their lot in life-- hating the manna God gave them and not appreciating their deliverance from slavery-- are like Ed, Al, and Izumi, who performed human transmutation-- a sin-- in an attempt to recapture what they once had. Their sins bite them like poisonous snakes, making monsters and taking vital parts of their bodies. the flamel, as a parallel to the bronze snake of the passage, is a reminder of their sin which is intended to make them remember their transgressions and repent their actions-- a symbolic equivalent to Ed's scrawling "Don't Forget" in his pocket watch.

...I hope that made sense. I'm so tired... *loves symbolism* I probably made a mistake or missed something, especially because I'm no expert when it comes to the Bible. Anyone else have a crack at it?
(Deleted comment)
ceruleanpureceruleanpure on May 4th, 2005 08:27 am (UTC)
*giggles* Well, his is determined. ^.~ That's for sure.
corinn on May 4th, 2005 12:31 pm (UTC)
Red can also signify Christ's blood-- sacrifice for the salvation of others, i.e. redemption from sin.

Which is why candy canes have red stripes~! *knows too much blasted symbolic trivia*
ceruleanpureceruleanpure on May 4th, 2005 03:02 pm (UTC)
Which is why candy canes have red stripes~!

o_O! I learned something new! ^__^
corinn on May 4th, 2005 11:34 pm (UTC)
It's why candy canes with their red stripes are Christmas candy and generally not seen the rest of the year. =3

\(^o^)/ I taught someone something new!
corinn on May 4th, 2005 11:36 pm (UTC)
Oh, forgot: I think the white on candy canes symbolizes Christ's purity, or the purity brought by the shedding of Christ's blood. *ponder* Something like that.
ceruleanpureceruleanpure on May 5th, 2005 06:27 am (UTC)
Yay! I shall now spread this new found knowledge! ^_____^
ceruleanpureceruleanpure on May 4th, 2005 08:26 am (UTC)
Wow. I love your interpretation! <33.
*feels like I understand FMA more* ^___^
(Deleted comment)
corinn on May 4th, 2005 12:39 pm (UTC)
I think it IS also a nod to the caduceus. After all, Hermes was a child prodigy who tricked Apollo into a deal to his advantage. And Apollo was the god of the fiery sun and strategy and music and foreknowledge and loved the ladies (Daphne, anyone?), etc.

...

.....Parallel between Roy and Apollo much? XD And Ed and Hermes.

Not to mention Hermes being patron of "the Hermetic Art" and "The Emerald Table of Hermes," which was HUUUUGELY important to alchemy. As in, "Here are coded instructions for making the Philosophers' Stone~!"
Capitian Red Squallsaanders on May 4th, 2005 03:13 pm (UTC)
The Snake on a stick (or flamel if you want to sound intelligent) is also used to symbolize healing, which is why you can find in in/outside many docters offices. I originally became familiar with it and the bible passage because my dentist has one outside his office done in copper. So if you go that root of traditional symbolism you could also say that the flamel represents Ed and Al's desire to set things right, or heal the wounds they created. It could also go with the idea that when they were practicing forbidden alchemy they were originally attempting to heal their broken hearts, and then their broken bodies which they could have said to have received in fair trade for healing of their hearts since the series seems to have such an emphasis on equal parts and balances.
corinn on May 4th, 2005 11:32 pm (UTC)
There's a difference between the caduceus and the Staff of Asclepius, however. I think the flamel is a combination of both.

Hermes's Caduceus: one snake
Staff of Asclepius: two snakes

Hermes's Caduceus: not generally wingèd
Staff of Asclepius: generally wingèd

Hermes's Caduceus: symbolic of shepherdry ~ sometimes equated to reference to God/Jesus as the Shepherd; but also of trickery
Staff of Asclepius: symbolic of healing

You'd really have to read the myths of Hermes and Asclepius.

Noteworthy: Asclepius was said to be such a talented healer that he could successfully raise the dead, and the gods were so angered/disturbed by this that Zeus struck him down with a bolt of lightning. (As I recall off the top of my head.)

Asclepius = those who have attempted human transmutation, I bet.
Hermes = brilliance, intelligence, swiftness, trickery... all of which describe Ed.

So I think Caduceus + Staff of Asclepius = flamel.

I need to research this....